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About IVAC


Islington Voluntary Action Council
322 Upper Street, London N1 2XQ
Tel: 020 7226 4862
Fax: 020 7359 7442
Email: information@ivac.org.uk


IVAC: promoting a thriving, effective, and influential voluntary sector in Islington.

IVAC’s Mission Statement:

IVAC believes that the voluntary sector plays a vital role in enhancing the quality of life of people who live and work within the Borough.
IVAC exists to promote a thriving, effective, and influential voluntary sector in Islington. It works at a strategic level, to promote the interests of the sector and at a local level providing services and support to voluntary organisations in the Borough.
IVAC works with people who are interested in developing voluntary action whether they be from voluntary, community or statutory agencies.

AIMS

IVAC aims to enable an independent, well-resourced voluntary sector to provide good quality, cost-effective services to Islington people, particularly those in need. It will:

  • Provide information, consultancy, training, advice and support to the Islington voluntary sector.
  • Help co-ordinate the voluntary sector, and promote liaison and partnership within the sector, as well as with statutory agencies.
  • Represent the views of the sector to statutory agencies.
  • Target its services particularly to groups which have experienced discrimination, or which have been excluded from access to services.

    Thirty Years of IVAC

IVAC started life in 1971 as Islington Council of Social Service (ICSS). The group was set up with grant aid from Islington Council, after several years’ planning by around 120 Islington voluntary groups. From the start, its areas of work included:

* Bringing local voluntary agencies together;
* Liasing with Islington Council on issues that affected the sector;
* Promoting the work of the Islington voluntary sector through directories and exhibitions;
* Promoting volunteering in the borough;
* Disseminating funding information;
* Distributing a newsletter; and
* Offering practical services such as photocopying and room hire.

By its second year, ICSS had 117 members and had supplemented its council funding with a grant from the City Parochial Trust. Over the years its membership grew and its funding base diversified. In 1978 its name changed to Islington Voluntary Action Council (IVAC).

By the eighties, IVAC had joined the National Council for Voluntary Service as a CVS. Work had begun to focus on the areas which continue to be central today: organisational development, information and advice, fundraising support, training, financial services, and room hire.

Throughout the years, IVAC has been involved in campaigning and development work on a range of issues, including health, community care, disabled access, play, local economic development, advice work, planning, transport, the environment, black and minority ethnic issues, homelessness, refugees and asylum seekers, and training and employment. Many local organisations and networks have sprung from this work, some of which are still flourishing today and are central to the voluntary sector in Islington. These include the Factory Community Centre, Islington Disablement Association (now Disability Action Islington), and Islington Volunteer Centre. IVAC also supported the transformation of Islington Old People’s Welfare Association into Islington Age Concern.

IVAC has supported the Islington voluntary sector through thirty years of political and economic upheaval, including the winding down of the Greater London Council and annual rounds of cuts to council funding of voluntary organisations. Gentrification of Islington has changed the population and driven up the property prices, but has not done away with poverty and social exclusion. New generations of refugees and asylum seekers have also changed the profile of the borough: the most widely spoken languages (other than English) among Islington schoolchildren today are Turkish, Bengali/ Sylheti, Yoruba and Igbo. The changing needs of the people of the borough are reflected in the extraordinary diversity of the groups IVAC has worked with and continues to work with. Today IVAC has more member organisations than ever – 368 - and its work continues to develop into new areas such as IT and health.

To download IVAC's latest Annual Report, click here.


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